ARISTOTLE QUOTES IX

Greek philosopher (384 B.C. - 322 B.C.)

Since the objects of imitation are men in action, and these men must be either of a higher or a lower type (for moral character mainly answers to these divisions, goodness and badness being the distinguishing marks of moral differences), it follows that we must represent men either as better than in real life, or as worse, or as they are.

ARISTOTLE, Poetics

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Justice is the fundamental virtue of political society, since the order of society cannot be maintained without law, and laws are instituted to declare what is just.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

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Among the various instruments subservient to the comfort of human life, there is this material distinction; that the work performed by one class, consists in production; and the work performed by another, is totally consumed in use.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

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But the merchant, if faithful to his principles, always employs his money reluctantly for any other purpose than that of augmenting itself.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

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Whoever, therefore, is unfit to live in a commonwealth, is above or below humanity.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

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By plot, I here mean the arrangement of the incidents.

ARISTOTLE, Poetics

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But if safety be their common concern, the good of the governors must correspond with the good of the governed, and the interest of the servant must coincide with the interest of the master.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

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Perfected by the offices and duties of social life, man is the best, but, rude and undisciplined, he is the very worst of animals.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

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As a drop of honey is dissipated and lost in a pail of water, so the sweet affection of love would totally vanish through too extensive a diffusion.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

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A whole is that which has a beginning, a middle, and an end.

ARISTOTLE, Poetics

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Now there are two ways in which fire outside the body can, as we see, come to an end, namely, exhaustion and extinction. By exhaustion we mean that termination which is produced by the fire itself; by extinction, that which is produced by the contraries of fire.

ARISTOTLE, On Youth & Old Age, Life & Death

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Tragedy--as also Comedy--was at first mere improvisation.

ARISTOTLE, Poetics

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It is not to avoid cold or hunger that tyrants cover themselves with blood; and states decree the most illustrious rewards, not to him who catches a thief, but to him who kills an usurper.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

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The tragedies of most of our modern poets fail in the rendering of character; and of poets in general this is often true.

ARISTOTLE, Poetics

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Novices in the art attain to finish of diction and precision of portraiture before they can construct the plot.

ARISTOTLE, Poetics

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Man delights in society far more than do bees or herds.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

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Superiority in war ... cannot surely be a proof of justice, since wars are often unjustly undertaken, and successfully, though wickedly, carried on and concluded.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

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In proportion as labor is divided, arts are perfected.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

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A family, to be complete, must consist of freemen and slaves; and as every complex object naturally resolves itself into simple elements, we must consider the elements of a family--the master and servant, the husband and wife, the father and children; what all of these are in themselves, and what are the relations which they naturally and properly bear to each other.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

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To learn gives the liveliest pleasure, not only to philosophers but to men in general.

ARISTOTLE, Poetics

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Tags: learning