ARISTOTLE QUOTES VI

Greek philosopher (384 B.C. - 322 B.C.)

Wickedness is nourished by lust.

ARISTOTLE, attributed, Day's Collacon

0 likes

Tags: lust


Pleasure in the job puts perfection in the work.

ARISTOTLE, attributed, Wisdom for the Soul

0 likes

Tags: work


Victory is the end of generalship.

ARISTOTLE, Nicomachean Ethics

0 likes

Tags: victory


Remember that time slurs over everything, let all deeds fade, blurs all writings and kills all memories. Exempt are only those which dig into the hearts of men by love.

ARISTOTLE, letter to Alexander on the policy toward the Cities

0 likes


We need relaxation because we cannot work continuously. Relaxation, then, is not an end; for it is taken for the sake of activity.

ARISTOTLE, The Nicomachean Ethics

0 likes

Tags: relaxation


Bad men are full of repentance.

ARISTOTLE, Nicomachean Ethics

0 likes

Tags: repentance


Be studious to preserve your reputation; if that be once lost, you are like a cancelled writing, of no value, and at best you do but survive your own funeral.

ARISTOTLE, attributed, Day's Collacon

0 likes

Tags: reputation


Probable impossibilities are always to be preferred to improbable possibilities.

ARISTOTLE, Poetics

0 likes

Tags: possibility


The wise man must not be ordered but must order, and he must not obey another, but the less wise must obey him.

ARISTOTLE, Metaphysics

0 likes

Tags: obedience


Wicked men obey for fear, but the good for love.

ARISTOTLE, attributed, Day's Collacon

0 likes


All action presupposes an end.

ARISTOTLE, Nicomachean Ethics

0 likes

Tags: action


But tangible differ from visible and sonorous impressions, in that the latter are perceived by the medium acting in some way upon us, while the former are perceived, not by, but together with, the medium, like a man who is struck through his shield--for it is not the shield which, having been struck, strikes him, but the shield and he are simultaneously struck together.

ARISTOTLE, On the Vital Principle

0 likes


Rhetoric is useful because things that are true and things that are just have a natural tendency to prevail over their opposites, so that if the decisions of judges are not what they ought to be, the defeat must be due to the speakers themselves, and they must be blamed accordingly.

ARISTOTLE, Rhetoric

0 likes


A man who has been well trained will not in any case look for more accuracy than the nature of the matter allows; for to expect exact demonstration from a rhetorician is as absurd as to accept from a mathematician a statement only probable.

ARISTOTLE, Nicomachean Ethics

0 likes


It is absurd to hold that a man ought to be ashamed of being unable to defend himself with his limbs, but not of being unable to defend himself with speach and reason, when the use of rational speech is more distinctive of a human being than the use of his limbs.

ARISTOTLE, Rhetoric

0 likes


Now ends clearly differ from one another. For, firstly, in some cases the end is an act, while in others it is a material result beyond and besides that act. And, where the action involves any such end beyond itself, this end is of necessity better than is the act by which it is produced.

ARISTOTLE, Nicomachean Ethics

0 likes


Both excess and defect are alike prejudicial to moral virtue.

ARISTOTLE, Nicomachean Ethics

0 likes

Tags: virtue


Now each man can give a good judgment upon matters with which he is acquainted, and is in such cases a good judge. In each particular case, therefore, he judges best who has been taught the matter in question, and on all matters he whose education has been universal.

ARISTOTLE, Nicomachean Ethics

0 likes

Tags: knowledge


What, then, is in each case the chief good? Surely it will be that to which all else that is done is but a means. And this in medicine will be health, and in tactics victory, and in architecture a house, and so forth in other cases.

ARISTOTLE, Nicomachean Ethics

0 likes


It may then be asked whether there is but one mode of impression for all the senses, seeing that taste and touch are acted upon by contact, and the other senses from a distance? But yet this is a seeming difference only, for we perceive the hard and the soft, as we do the odorous, the sonorous, and the visible, through media; with this difference, that the former impressions are made by objects close to, and the latter by objects at a distance from us. On which account, as we perceive all things through a medium, the medium, in the case of bodies close to us, escapes our attention; but if, as we have already said, we could be sensible of all tangible impressions through a membraneous substance, without our being conscious of their having been so transmitted, we should then be situated as we now are, when in water or air; for so situated, we seem to touch bodies directly, and to have no impression from them through a medium.

ARISTOTLE, On the Vital Principle

0 likes