ARISTOTLE QUOTES X

Greek philosopher (384 B.C. - 322 B.C.)

Kings ought to differ from their subjects, not in kind, but in perfection.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

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Every Tragedy, therefore, must have six parts, which parts determine its quality--namely, Plot, Character, Diction, Thought, Spectacle, Song.

ARISTOTLE, Poetics

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It is found by experience, that those instruments are the most perfect, which are each of them contrived for its specific use.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

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Without action there cannot be a tragedy; there may be without character.

ARISTOTLE, Poetics

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Tags: action


A citizen is a constituent part of a whole or system, which invests him with powers and qualifies him for functions, for which, in his individual capacity, he is totally unfit; and independently of which system, he might subsist indeed as a solitary savage, but could never attain that improved and happy state to which his progressive nature invariably tends.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

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The man fit to command may be compared with the architect, who adjusts the plan and directs its execution. His skill must extend to every part of the work; that of his workmen is limited by their respective tasks.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

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Tags: leadership


Objects which in themselves we view with pain, we delight to contemplate when reproduced with minute fidelity: such as the forms of the most ignoble animals and of dead bodies.

ARISTOTLE, Poetics

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Man is armed with craft and courage, which, untamed by justice, he will most wickedly pervert, and become at once the most impious and the fiercest of monsters.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

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A beginning is that which does not itself follow anything by causal necessity, but after which something naturally is or comes to be.

ARISTOTLE, Poetics

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Magistrates rule by an established rotation; kings reign for life.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

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Polygnotus depicted men as nobler than they are, Pauson as less noble, Dionysius drew them true to life.

ARISTOTLE, Poetics

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For the roots of plants are analogous to what is called the mouth in an animal, being the organ by which food is admitted.

ARISTOTLE, On Youth & Old Age, Life & Death

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To some writers, nothing appears of so much consequence as the skillful regulation of property; because it is this much coveted object that gives birth to most disputes and most seditions.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

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In the work of government, reason is the architect; it is the part of reason to command, and the duty of weakness and of passion to obey.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

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Dramatic action, therefore, is not with a view to the representation of character: character comes in as subsidiary to the actions. Hence the incidents and the plot are the end of a tragedy; and the end is the chief thing of all.

ARISTOTLE, Poetics

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Tags: writing


Government and subjection, then, are things useful and necessary; they prevail everywhere, in animated as well as in brute matter; from their first origin, some natures are formed to command, and others to obey; the kinds of government and subjection varying with the differences of their objects, but all equally useful for their respective ends.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

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A participation in rights and advantages forms the bond of political society; an institution prior, in the intention of nature, to the families and individuals from whom it is constituted.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

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The necessity of perpetuating the species, forms the combining principle between males and females; a principle independent of choice or design, and alike incident to animals and to plants, which are all naturally impelled to propagate their respective kinds.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

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A beautiful object, whether it be a picture of a living organism or any whole composed of parts, must not only have an orderly arrangement of parts, but most also be of a certain magnitude; for beauty depends on magnitude and order.

ARISTOTLE, Poetics

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He, therefore, who first collected societies, was the greatest benefactor of mankind.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

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Tags: society