ARISTOTLE QUOTES III

Greek philosopher (384 B.C. - 322 B.C.)

Aristotle quote

For it is not true, as some treatise-mongers lay down in their systems, of the probity of the speaker, that it contributes nothing to persuasion; but moral character nearly, I may say, carries with it the most sovereign efficacy in making credible.

ARISTOTLE, Rhetoric

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The light of the day is followed by night, as a shadow follows a body.

ARISTOTLE, attributed, Day's Collacon

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Time is not composed of indivisible nows any more than any other magnitude is composed of indivisibles.

ARISTOTLE, Physics

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Most of the things about which we make decisions, and into which therefore we inquire, present us with alternative possibilities.

ARISTOTLE, Rhetoric

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Reason ... governs like a just and lawful prince, and the little community of man is thus held together and sustained.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

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The majority of mankind would seem to be beguiled into error by pleasure, which, not being really a good, yet seems to be so. So that they indiscriminately choose as good whatsoever gives them pleasure, while they avoid all pain alike as evil.

ARISTOTLE, Nicomachean Ethics

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Without virtue it is difficult to bear gracefully the honors of fortune.

ARISTOTLE, Nicomachean Ethics

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We are masters of our actions from the beginning up to the very end. But, in the case of our habits, we are only masters of their commencement--each particular little increase being as imperceptible as in the case of bodily infirmities. But yet our habits are voluntary, in that it was once in our power to adopt or not to adopt such or such a course of conduct.

ARISTOTLE, Nicomachean Ethics

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Purpose ... is held to be most closely connected with virtue, and to be a better token of our character than are even our acts.

ARISTOTLE, Nicomachean Ethics

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Democracy is when the indigent, and not the men of property, are the rulers.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

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Beauty is the gift from God.

ARISTOTLE, Nicomachean Ethics

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Moral virtue is ... a mean between two vices, that of excess and that of defect, and ... it is no small task to hit the mean in each case, as it is not, for example, any chance comer, but only the geometer, who can find the center of a given circle.

ARISTOTLE, Nicomachean Ethics

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The many are more incorruptible than the few; they are like the greater quantity of water which is less easily corrupted than a little.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

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Every wicked man is in ignorance as to what he ought to do, and from what to abstain, and it is because of error such as this that men become unjust and, in a word, wicked.

ARISTOTLE, Nicomachean Ethics

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Without friends no one would choose to live, though he had all other goods.

ARISTOTLE, Nicomachean Ethics

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Poetry is finer and more philosophical than history; for poetry expresses the universal, and history only the particular.

ARISTOTLE, Poetics

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Freedom is obedience to self-formulated rules.

ARISTOTLE, Nicomachean Ethics

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The truly good and wise man will bear all kinds of fortune in a seemly way, and will always act in the noblest manner that the circumstances allow.

ARISTOTLE, Nicomachean Ethics

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Nature flies from the infinite, for the infinite is unending or imperfect, and Nature ever seeks to amend.

ARISTOTLE, On the Generation of Animals

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I call that law universal, which is conformable merely to dictates of nature; for there does exist naturally an universal sense of right and wrong, which, in a certain degree, all intuitively divine, even should no intercourse with each other, nor any compact have existed.

ARISTOTLE, Rhetoric

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