ARISTOTLE QUOTES VII

Greek philosopher (384 B.C. - 322 B.C.)

Concerning things which exist or will exist inevitably, or which cannot possibly exist or take place, no counsel can be given.

ARISTOTLE, Rhetoric

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Now, it is of great moment that well-drawn laws should themselves define all the points they possibly can and leave as few as may be to the decision of the judges; and for this several reasons. First, to find one man, or a few men, who are sensible persons and capable of legislating and administering justice is easier than to find a large number. Next, laws are made after long consideration, whereas decisions in the courts are given at short notice, which makes it hard for those who try the case to satisfy the claims of justice and expediency.

ARISTOTLE, Rhetoric

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Tags: law


Our statements will be adequate if made with as much clearness as the matter allows.

ARISTOTLE, Nicomachean Ethics

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One may perhaps be led to suppose that it is virtue that is the end of the statesman's life. Yet even virtue itself would seem to fall short of being an absolute end.

ARISTOTLE, Nicomachean Ethics

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Tags: politics


Happiness is a thing which calls for honor rather than for praise.

ARISTOTLE, Nicomachean Ethics

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There are, then, these three means of effecting persuasion. The man who is to be in command of them must, it is clear, be able (1) to reason logically, (2) to understand human character and goodness in their various forms, and (3) to understand the emotions--that is, to name them and describe them, to know their causes and the way in which they are excited.

ARISTOTLE, Rhetoric

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Abstract accuracy is no more to be expected in all philosophic treatises than in all products of art, and noble and just acts with which the art political is concerned admit of such great variation and of so many differences that they have been held to depend upon conventional rather than upon real distinctions.

ARISTOTLE, Nicomachean Ethics

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Happiness consists in the consciousness of a life in which the highest Virtue is actively manifested.

ARISTOTLE, Nicomachean Ethics

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Wealth is clearly not the absolute good of which we are in search, for it is a utility, and only desirable as a means.

ARISTOTLE, Nicomachean Ethics

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A statement is persuasive and credible either because it is directly self-evident or because it appears to be proved from other statements that are so. In either case it is persuasive because there is somebody whom it persuades.

ARISTOTLE, Rhetoric

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Every commonwealth being, as we have said, a partnership, it follows, that in every commonwealth men must be partners in some things or in all. Some things they must possess in common, since the community could not otherwise subsist.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

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Tags: community


For the medium being the same, and the objects the same, the poet may imitate by narration--in which case he can either take another personality as Homer does, or speak in his own person, unchanged--or he may represent all his characters as living and moving before us.

ARISTOTLE, Poetics

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Tags: poetry


If you string together a set of speeches expressive of character, and well finished in point of diction and thought, you will not produce the essential tragic effect nearly so well as with a play which, however deficient in these respects, yet has a plot and artistically constructed incidents.

ARISTOTLE, Poetics

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Tags: playwriting


Were part of the human race to be arrayed in that splendor of beauty which beams from the statues of gods, universal consent would acknowledge the rest of mankind naturally formed to be their slaves.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

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The law itself is accused of iniquity, and impeached, like the orators of Athens when they have persuaded the assembly to pass unjust decrees.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

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Thus, then ... are the three differences which distinguish artistic imitation: the medium, the objects, and the manner.

ARISTOTLE, Poetics

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Tags: art


Whether government be a good or a bad thing, it is fair that men of equal abilities and virtues should equally share in it; that they should receive the advantage of it as their right, or bear the burden of it as their duty.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

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Communities could not subsist without foresight to discern, as well as exertion to effectuate the measures requisite for their safety. Men capable of discerning those measures, are made for authority; and men merely capable of effectuating them by bodily labor, are made for obedience.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

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Tags: authority


But most important of all is the structure of the incidents. For Tragedy is an imitation, not of men, but of an action and of life, and life consists in action.

ARISTOTLE, Poetics

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That which is a common concern is very generally neglected. The energies of man are excited by that which depends on himself alone, and of which he only is to reap the whole profit or glory.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

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Tags: selfishness