ARISTOTLE QUOTES VIII

Greek philosopher (384 B.C. - 322 B.C.)

Nothing can be truly just which is inconsistent with humanity.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

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The most beautiful colors, laid on confusedly, will not give as much pleasure as the chalk outline of a portrait.

ARISTOTLE, Poetics

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Once dialogue had come in, Nature herself discovered the appropriate measure. For the iambic is, of all measures, the most colloquial.

ARISTOTLE, Poetics

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Now, of the various parts or faculties of the soul--whichever may be the proper term by which to designate them--the only ones with which we need now concern ourselves are those which belong to all such living things as possess not only life but animality. For, though an animal must necessarily be a living thing, living things are by no means of necessity animals; for plants live, and yet are without sensation, which is the distinctive characteristic of an animal. And the part in which is lodged that faculty of the soul in virtue of which a thing lives must also be the part in which is lodged that faculty in virtue of which we call it an animal.

ARISTOTLE, On Youth & Old Age, Life & Death

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Every political society forms, it is plain, a sort of community or partnership, instituted for the benefit of the partners. Utility is the end and aim of every such institution; and the greatest and most extensive utility is the aim of that great association, comprehending all the rest, and known by the name of a commonwealth.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

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Nature, we see, has variously moulded the human frame: some men are strongly built, and firmly compacted; others erect and graceful, unfit for toil and drudgery, but capable of sustaining honourably the offices of war and peace. This, however, holds not universally; for a servile mind is often lodged in a graceful person; and we have often found bodies formed for servitude, animated by the souls of freemen.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

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The advantageous situation of the capital and of the territory is necessarily a part of the common stock; and all men who inhabit the same city and country must breathe the same air, and enjoy the same climate.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

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Discontents arise not merely from the inequality of possessions, but from the equality of honors. The multitude complain that property is unjustly, because unequally, distributed; men of superior merit or superior pretentions complain that honors are unjustly, if equally, distributed.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

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Comedy is, as we have said, an imitation of characters of a lower type--not, however, in the full sense of the word bad, the ludicrous being merely a subdivision of the ugly.

ARISTOTLE, Poetics

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The Plot, then, is the first principle, and, as it were, the soul of a tragedy.

ARISTOTLE, Poetics

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Tags: writing


For in man, and in man alone, owing to is erect attitude, the upper part of the body is turned toward the upper part of the universe; while in other animals it is turned neither to this nor to the lower aspects, but in a direction midway between the two.

ARISTOTLE, On Youth & Old Age, Life & Death

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Tags: men


Tragedy, then, is an imitation of an action that is serious, complete, and of a certain magnitude; in language embellished with each kind of artistic ornament, the several kinds being found in separate parts of the play in the form of action, not of narrative; through pity and fear effecting the proper purgation of these emotions.

ARISTOTLE, Poetics

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Money ... is founded merely on convention; its currency and value depending on the mutable wills of men.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

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Tragedy advanced by slow degrees; each new element that showed itself was in turn developed. Having passed through many changes, it found its natural form, and there it stopped.

ARISTOTLE, Poetics

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Thought is required wherever a statement is proved, or, it may be, a general truth enunciated.

ARISTOTLE, Poetics

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The hand or foot, when separated from the body, retains indeed its name, but totally changes its nature, because it is completely divested of its uses and of its powers.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

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Dancing imitates character, emotion, and action, by rhythmical movement.

ARISTOTLE, Poetics

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The wickedness of man is boundless; it seems at first as if a trifle would content him, but his passions invigorate by gratification; always indulged, always craving, and continually preying on him who feeds him.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

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The instinct of imitation is implanted in man from childhood, one difference between him and other animals being that he is the most imitative of creatures; and through imitation he learns his earliest lessons.

ARISTOTLE, Poetics

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The greatest crimes are committed ... for obtaining or securing the objects of ill-regulated desires, and senseless, because insatiable, passions.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

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Tags: crime