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WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE QUOTES II

But, O, how bitter a thing it is to look into happiness through another man's eyes!

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, As You Like It

Time be thine,
And thy best graces spend it at thy will.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Hamlet

For marriage is a matter of more worth
Than to be dealt with in attorneyship.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Henry VI

Lovers and madmen have such seething brains,
Such shaping fantasies, that apprehend
More than cool reason ever comprehends.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, A Midsummer Night's Dream

On Fortune's cap we are not the very button.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Hamlet

For what is wedlock forced but a hell,
An age of discord and continued strife?
Whereas the contrary bringeth forth bliss,
And is a pattern of celestial peace.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Henry VI

Let me not to the marriage of true minds
Admit impediments. Love is not love
Which alters when it alteration finds,
Or bends with the remover to remove.
Oh, no, it is an ever-fixèd mark
That looks on tempests and is never shaken;
It is the star to every wandering bark
Whose worth's unknown, although its height be taken.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, sonnet cxvi

The world must be peopled. When I said I would die a bachelor, I did not think I should live till I were married.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Much Ado About Nothing

Thou shouldst not have been old till thou hadst been wise.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, King Lear

Yet the first bringer of unwelcome news
Hath but a losing office; and his tongue
Sounds ever after as a sullen bell,
Remember'd tolling a departed friend.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, King Lear

Rudeness is a sauce to his good wit,
Which gives men stomach to digest his words,
With better appetite.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Julius Caesar

There's small choice in rotten apples.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, The Taming of the Shrew

O, that this too too solid flesh would melt,
Thaw and resolve itself into a dew,
Or that the Everlasting had not fixed
His canon 'gainst self-slaughter. O God, God,
How weary, stale, flat and unprofitable
Seem to me all the uses of this world!
Fie on't, ah, fie, 'tis an unweeded garden
That grows to seed. Things rank and gross in nature
Possess it merely.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Hamlet

Oh, it is excellent to have a giant's strength, but it is tyrannous to use it like a giant.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Measure for Measure

For slander lives upon succession,
Forever housed where it gets possession.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, The Comedy of Errors

He will lie, sir, with such volubility, that you would think truth were a fool.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, All's Well That Ends Well

The apparel oft proclaims the man.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Hamlet

Frailty, thy name is woman.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Hamlet

Seest thou not what a deformed thief this fashion is?

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Much Ado About Nothing

These lies are like the father that begets them; gross as a mountain, open, palpable.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Henry IV, Part I

Patience is sottish, and impatience does become a dog that's mad.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Antony and Cleopatra

Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow,
Creeps in this petty pace from day to day
To the last syllable of recorded time,
And all our yesterdays have lighted fools
The way to dusty death.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Macbeth

Youth to itself rebels, though none else near.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Hamlet

Patience is pale cold cowardice in noble breasts.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Richard II

Though patience be a tired mare, yet she will plod.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Henry V

The fashion wears out more apparel than the man.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Much Ado About Nothing

Doubt thou the stars are fire;
Doubt that the sun doth move;
Doubt truth to be a liar;
But never doubt I love.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Hamlet

I wasted time, and now doth time waste me.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Richard II

Ay, but to die, and go we know not where;
To lie in cold obstruction, and to rot;
This sensible war motion to become
A kneaded clod, and the dilated spirit
To bathe in fiery floods, or to reside
In thrilling region of thick-ribbèd ice;
To be imprisoned in the viewless winds,
And blown with restless violence round about
The pendant world; or to be worse than worst
Of those that lawless and incertain thought
Imagine howling -- 'tis too horrible!
The weariest and most loathèd worldly life
That age, ache, penury, and imprisonment
Can lay on nature is a paradise
To what we fear of death.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Measure for Measure

Golden lads and girls all must
As chimney-sweepers come to dust.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Cymbeline

All that lives must die,
Passing through nature to eternity.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Hamlet

Come not between the dragon and his wrath.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, King Lear

Your wit's too hot, it speeds too fast, 'twill tire.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Love's Labour's Lost

Give sorrow words; the grief that does not speak knits up the o-er wrought heart and bids it break.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Macbeth

There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio,
Than are dreamt of in your philosophy.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Hamlet

Use every man after his desert, and who should 'scape whipping?

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Hamlet

Things won are done, joy's soul lies in the doing.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Troilus and Cressida

We all are men, in our own natures frail, and capable of our flesh; few are angels.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Henry VIII

Season your admiration for a while.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Hamlet

I have no spur to prick the sides of my intent, but only vaulting ambition, which o'erleaps itself and falls on the other.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Macbeth

Good night, sweet prince, and flights of angels sing thee to thy rest!

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Hamlet

So may the outward shows be least themselves:
The world is still deceived with ornament.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, The Merchant of Venice

You taught me language; and my profit on't
Is, I know how to curse.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, The Tempest

All hoods make not monks.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, The Merchant of Venice

When we mean to build,
We first survey the plot, then draw the model;
And when we see the figure of the house,
Then must we rate the cost of the erection.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Henry IV, Part II

Thus can the demi-god Authority
Make us pay down for our offense by weight.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Measure for Measure

Fie, fie upon her!
There's language in her eye, her cheek, her lip,
Nay, her foot speaks; her wanton spirits look out
At every joint and motive of her body.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Troilus and Cressida

I am not only witty in myself, but the cause that wit is in other men.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Henry IV, Part II

Your bait of falsehood takes this carp of truth.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Hamlet

So wise so young, they say, do never live long.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Richard III

My salad days;
When I was green in judgment.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Antony and Cleopatra

He has strangled
His language in his tears.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Henry VIII

Love comforteth, like sunshine after rain,
But lust's effect is tempest after sun;
Love's gentle spring doth always fresh remain,
Lust's winter comes ere summer half be done.
Love surfeits not; lust like a glutton dies:
Love is all truth; lust full of forged lies.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Venus and Adonis

Then move not, while my prayer's effect I take.
Thus from my lips, by yours, my sin is purg'd.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Romeo and Juliet

With mirth and laughter let old wrinkles come.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, The Merchant of Venice

My lips, two blushing pilgrims, ready stand
To smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Romeo and Juliet

The blood more stirs
To rouse a lion than to start a hare.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, King Henry IV, Part I

O, you shall see him laugh till his face be like a wet cloak ill laid up.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Henry IV, Part II

Wise men ne'er sit and wail their loss,
But cheerly seek how to redress their harms.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Henry VI, Part III

In thy face I see
The map of honor, truth, and loyalty.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, King Henry VI, Part II

Master, go on, and I will follow thee
To the last gasp with truth and loyalty.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, As You Like It

I will kiss thy lips;
Haply, some poison yet doth hang on them.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Romeo and Juliet

Thy wit is a very bitter sweeting: it is most sharp sauce.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Romeo and Juliet

Good luck lies in odd numbers.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, The Merry Wives of Windsor

Though lewdness court it in a shape of heaven;
So lust, though to a radiant angel link'd,
Will sate itself in a celestial bed,
And prey on garbage.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Hamlet

The hind that would be mated by the lion,
Must die for love.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, All's Well That Ends Well

Virtue itself 'scapes not calumnious strokes.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Hamlet

In thy foul throat thou liest.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Richard III

I am Sir Oracle,
And when I ope my lips, let no dog bark!

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, The Merchant of Venice

Like the lightning, which doth cease to be,
Ere one can say--It lightens!

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Romeo and Juliet

Divers philosophers hold that the lips is parcel of the mouth.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, The Marry Wives of Windsor

Light seeking light doth light of light beguile:
So, ere you find where light in darkness lies,
Your light grows dark by losing of your eyes.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Love's Labour's Lost

Come, and take choice of all my library,
And so beguile thy sorrow.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Titus Andronicus

Virginity is peevish, proud, idle, made of self-love, which is the most inhibited sin in the canon.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, All's Well That Ends Well

Lions make leopards tame.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, King Richard II

Wooing, wedding, and repenting is as a Scotch jig, a measure, and a cinque-pace: the first suit is hot and hasty like a Scotch jig--and full as fantastical; the wedding, mannerly modest, as a measure, full of state and ancientry; and then comes repentance and with his bad legs falls into the cinque-pace faster and faster, till he sink into his grave.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Much Ado About Nothing

Full oft we see
Cold wisdom waiting on superfluous folly.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, All's Well That Ends Well

Thy wit is as quick as the greyhound's mouth; it catches.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Much Ado About Nothing

Winter's not gone yet, if the wild-geese fly that way.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, King Lear

Wisdom and goodness to the vile seem vile.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, King Lear

A sentence is but a cheveril glove to a good wit;
How quickly the wrong side may be turned outward!

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Twelfth Night

Get a prayer-book in your hand,
And stand betwixt two churchmen.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Richard III

Saint Valentine is past;
Begin these wood-birds but to couple now?

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, A Midsummer Night's Dream

The jewel that we find, we stoop and take it
Because we see it; but what we do not see
We tread upon and never think of it.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Measure for Measure

Light vanity, insatiate cormorant,
Consuming means, soon preys upon itself.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Richard II

Where doth the world thrust forth a vanity--
So it be new, there's no respect how vile--
That is not quickly buzzed into his ears?

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Richard II

Vengeance is in my heart, death in my hand,
Blood and revenge are hammering in my head.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Titus Andronicus

There is no vice so simple but assumes
Some mark of virtue on his outward parts.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, The Merchant of Venice

That, you were made of, is metal to make virgins. Virginity, by being once lost, may be ten times found; by being ever kept, it is ever lost: 'tis too cold a companion; away with it.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, All's Well That Ends Well

Time hath, my lord, a wallet at his back,
Wherein he puts alms for oblivion.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Troilus and Cressida

No, I'll not weep:
I have full cause of weeping; but this heart
Shall break into a hundred thousand flaws
Or ere I'll weep.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, King Lear

My plenteous joys,
Wanton in fullness, seek to hide themselves
In drops of sorrow.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Macbeth

I cannot weep; for all my body's moisture
Scarce serves to quench my furnace-burning heart.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Henry VI, Part III

Did he break into tears?
In great measure.
A kind overflow of kindness: there are no faces truer than those that are so washed.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Much Ado About Nothing

See, see what showers arise,
Blown with the windy tempest of my heart.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Henry VI, Part III

What I should say
My tears gainsay; for every word I speak,
Ye see, I drink the water of mine eyes.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Henry VI, Part III

Most dangerous
Is that temptation that doth goad us on
To sin in loving virtue.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Measure for Measure

The river Thames that by our door doth pass,
His first beginning is but small and shallow;
Yet, keeping on his course, grows to a sea.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, his authorship of this play has been rejected by modern scholars who sometimes attribute it to Wentworth Smith or William Sly, The Life and Death of Thomas, Lord Cromwell

Had I but died an hour before this chance
I had liv'd a blessed time; for, from this instant,
There's nothing serious in mortality:
All is but toys; renown and grace is dead:
The wine of life is drawn, and the mere lees
Is left this vault to brag of.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Macbeth

Under the greenwood tree
Who loves to lie with me,
And tune his merry note
Unto the sweet bird's throat,
Come hither, come hither, come hither:
No enemy here shall he see,
But winter and rough weather.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, As You Like It

When I was at home, I was in a better place; but travellers must be content.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, As You Like It

I knew him tyrannous, and tyrants' fears
Decrease not, but grow faster than the years.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Pericles, Prince of Tyre

The mightier man, the mightier is the thing
What makes him honour'd, or begets him hate;
For greatest scandal waits on greatest state.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, The Rape of Lucrece

If you have hitherto conceal'd this sight,
Let it be tenable in your silence still.
And whatsoever else shall hap to-night,
Give it an understanding, but no tongue.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Hamlet

I am a man
More sinn'd against than sinning.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, King Lear

O, fie, fie, fie!
Thy sin's not accidental, but a trade.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Measure for Measure

He that doth the ravens feed,
Yea, providently caters for the sparrow,
Be comfort to my age!

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, As You Like It

Two may keep counsel, putting one away.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Romeo and Juliet

Master, master! news, old news, and such news as you never heard of!

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, The Taming of the Shrew

What need we any spur but our own cause,
To prick us to redress?

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Julius Caesar

All is confounded, all!
Reproach and everlasting shame
Sits mocking in our plumes.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Henry V

Be check'd for silence,
But never tax'd for speech.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, All's Well That Ends Well

Some sins do bear their privilege on earth.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, King John

O! she will sing the savageness out of a bear.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Othello

So thou be good, slander doth but approve
Thy worth the greater.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Sonnet LXX

Those happy smilets,
That play'd on her ripe lip, seem'd not to know
What guests were in her eyes; which parted thence,
As pearls from diamonds dropp'd.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, King Lear

Parting is such sweet sorrow that I shall say goodnight till it be morrow.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Romeo and Juliet

Joy, being altogether wanting,
It doth remember me the more of sorrow.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Richard II

Shine out, fair sun, till I have bought a glass,
That I may see my shadow as I pass.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Richard III

A plague upon it when thieves cannot be true one to another!

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Henry IV, Part I

His tongue is now a stringless instrument.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Richard II

If all the year were playing holidays;
to sport would be as tedious as work.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Henry IV

Suspicion always haunts the guilty mind;
The thief doth fear each bush an officer.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Henry VI, Part III

Men shut their doors against a setting sun.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Timon of Athens

Why, all the souls that are were forfeit once;
And He that might the vantage best have took
Found out the remedy.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Measure for Measure

The purest treasure mortal times afford
Is spotless reputation; that away,
Men are but gilded loam or painted clay.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Richard II

Good name in man and woman, dear my lord,
Is the immediate jewel of their souls:
Who steals my purse steals trash; 'tis something, nothing;
'Twas mine, 'tis his, and has been slave to thousands;
But he that filches from me my good name,
Robs me of that which not enriches him,
And makes me poor indeed.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Othello

The sauce to meat is ceremony;
Meeting were bare without it.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Macbeth

Never came reformation in a flood.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Henry V

I will be gone:
That pitiful rumour may report my flight,
To coasolate thine ear.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, All's Well That Ends Well

The painting is almost the natural man:
For since dishonour traffics with man's nature,
He is but outside; pencill'd figures are
Ev'n such as they give out.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Timon of Athens

Know you not,
The fire, that mounts the liquor till it run o'er,
In seeming to augment it, wastes it? Be advis'd:
I say again, there is no English soul
More stronger to direct you than yourself;
If with the sap of reason you would quench,
Or but allay, the fire of passion.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Henry VIII

Speak the speech, I pray you, as I pronounced it to you, trippingly on the tongue.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Hamlet

Those that much covet are with gain so fond,
For what they have not, that which they possess
They scatter and unloose it from their bond,
And so, by hoping more, they have but less;
Or, gaining more, the profit of excess
Is but to surfeit, and such griefs sustain,
That they prove bankrupt in this poor-rich gain.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, The Rape of Lucrece

Come, give us a taste of your quality.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Hamlet

My words fly up, my thoughts remain below;
Words without thoughts never to heaven go.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Hamlet

Bow, stubborn knees; and, heart, with strings of steel,
Be soft as sinews of the new-born babe.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Hamlet

All things are ready, if our mind be so.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Henry V

I do hate a proud man, as I hate the engendering of toads.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Troilus and Cressida

I have ventur'd,
Like little wanton boys that swim on bladders,
This many summers in a sea of glory,
But far beyond my depth: my high-blown pride
At length broke under me.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Henry VIII

I have been studying how I may compare
This prison where I live unto the world:
And for because the world is populous
And here is not a creature but myself,
I cannot do it; yet I'll hammer it out.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Richard II

Nor stony tower, nor walls of beaten brass,
Nor airless dungeon, nor strong links of iron,
Can be retentive to the strength of spirit;
But life, being weary of these worldly bars,
Never lacks power to dismiss itself.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Julius Caesar

Past and to come seems best; things present, worst.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Henry IV, Part 2

We are not ourselves
When nature, being oppress'd, commands the mind
To suffer with the body.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, King Lear

Now sit we close about this taper here,
And call in question our necessities.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Julius Caesar

There's a special providence in the fall of a sparrow. If it be now, 'tis not to come; if it be not to come, it will be now; if it be not now, yet it will come: the readiness is all.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Hamlet

Omission to do what is necessary
Seals a commission to a blank of danger.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Troilus and Cressida

Who are you? Why do you hide in the darkness and listen to my private thoughts?

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Romeo and Juliet

Fetter strong madness in a silken thread.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Much Ado About Nothing

And be these juggling fiends no more believ'd,
That palter with us in a double sense:
That keep the word of promise to our ear,
And break it to our hope.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Macbeth

Thy promises are like Adonis' gardens
That one day bloomed and fruitful were the next.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Henry VI, Part I

We know what we are, but know not what we may be.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Hamlet

Necessity's sharp pinch!

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, King Lear

Madness in great ones must not unwatched go.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Hamlet

News fitting to the night,
Black, fearful, comfortless and horrible.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, King John

A lion among ladies is a most dreadful thing.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, A Midsummer Night's Dream

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